Audio Streaming | Chrostmas | Fitness | Heart Disease | Lingerie

 

 

Article Navigation

Back To Main Page


 

Click Here for more articles

Google
A Guide to Home Gyms -
by: Marcus Peterson
Although the jogging fad of the 1970s has long subsided, many people exercise to stay in shape. Many people work out in public gyms, but an increasing number exercise at home, and the home fitness gym market is growing exponentially. With so many options now available, from universal gyms, to free weights, to Weider Crossbow machines, choosing the right home gym can be a challenging process.

It is important to keep in mind several factors when decided which home fitness gym is right for you. Your fitness goals, the amount of money you are willing to spend, the amount of space you have, and the complexity of the equipment are all factors that will need to be considered. Luckily, the answers to these problems often fit together in a way that simplifies the process of choosing the right home gym for you.

First, you need to figure out what your particular goals are. Do you want to lose weight? Are you looking to build strength or increase your endurance? Will more than one person use the home fitness gym? The answer is vital to deciding which type of home gym is best for you. Some home gyms are made specifically for one type of exercise, while others work on all areas of fitness.

The next item to consider is how much money you are willing to spend. Prices range from around $15 for a small set of free weights to over $2000 for a total home fitness center that can be used by two people at once. To an extent, the price reflects the quality of the system, but you also have to factor in what you will use your home fitness gym for. There is no sense in buying a top of the line total fitness home gym if you just want to lose a few pounds.

The amount of available space is also an area of concern. Some home fitness gyms can be compacted and fit in a closet, while others will take up the majority of a room. Once again, the price and primary purpose of the home gym will influence how much room it will need. For example, a pull-up bar can fit in a doorway and is relatively cheap, but it can only be used for one type of exercise.

Finally, some people have said that some of the more expensive and versatile home fitness gyms are too complicated to use and that they prefer something simpler, such as a set of free weights and a weight bench or a stationary bike.

One thing that becomes clear when taking all of these different factors into account is that they affect each other. To meet very simple and specific fitness goals, an inexpensive, simple, small home gym is the best buy. For more complex goals, or for the goals of an entire household, a larger, expensive, complex machine may be needed.

About the author:
Home Gyms Info provides detailed information on cheap, best, used, discount, free weight, and universal home gyms, plus reviews of best home gym products, and more. Home Gyms Info is the sister site of Whey Protein Web.

Circulated by Article Emporium

 



©2008 - All Rights Reserved Sitemap
Google Page Rank